Last edited by Kaganris
Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of Biological effects of external X and gamma radiation. found in the catalog.

Biological effects of external X and gamma radiation.

Raymond Elliott Zirkle

Biological effects of external X and gamma radiation.

by Raymond Elliott Zirkle

  • 223 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by McGraw-Hill in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Radiation -- Physiological effect.

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesNational nuclear energy series. Manhattan Project technical section. Division IV: Plutonium Project record ;, v. 22B.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQH652 .Z49
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6138279M
    LC Control Number53012876
    OCLC/WorldCa2322084

    This volume records some of the results of research done under the Manhattan Project and the Atomic Energy Commission between and It has eight contributing authors and 16 chapters. The greater part of the results reported were obtained by Dr. I. R. Raper while at the Clinton Laboratories. One can also consider exposures to X-rays, gamma rays, alpha or beta particles and neutrons separately, taking each as internal or external to the body. There are further differences in health effects based on differences between people receiving the radiation.

    Buy Biological Effects Of Radiation with lucrative deals right here. Buy Biological Effects Of Radiation at cost effective prices. Biological effects of external X and gamma radiation. Biological Effects of - $ BBMC8G Biological effects of radiations A Blaisdell book in the. Biological Effects of - $ Early developments in radiation therapy. Radiation has been present throughout the evolution of life on r, with the discovery of X-rays in by German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, and with the discovery of radioactivity by French physicist Henri Becquerel, the biological effects of radiation were the early 20th century, ionizing radiation came into use to.

    The effects of ionizing radiation depend on the dose in rads, but also on the type of radiation (alpha, beta, gamma, or X-ray) and the type of tissue. For example, if the range of the radiation is small, as it is for α α rays, then the ionization and the damage created is more concentrated and harder for the organism to repair. In medical applications, the radiation absorbed dose (rad) is more often used (1 rad = Gy; 1 rad results in the absorption of J/kg of tissue). The SI unit measuring tissue damage caused by radiation is the sievert (Sv). This takes into account both the energy and the biological effects of the type of radiation involved in the.


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Biological effects of external X and gamma radiation by Raymond Elliott Zirkle Download PDF EPUB FB2

This monograph evaluates carcinogenic risks to humans posed by exposure to X- and γ-radiation and to neutrons from external sources. The book opens with a general introduction to nomenclature, dosimetric methods and models in the occupational and environmental settings, the behaviour of radiation in biological tissues, and sources of human exposure.

Natural background radiation is identified. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Zirkle, Raymond E. (Raymond Elliot), Biological effects of external X and gamma radiation.

New York, McGraw-Hill, Book: Biological effects of external X and Gamma radiation. Part I. + pp. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by by: 1.

Biological Effects of External X and Gamma I. Raymond E. Zirkle, Ed. McGraw-Hill, New York-London, xxvi + pp. Illus. $Author: Titus C. Evans. Europe PMC is an ELIXIR Core Data Resource Learn more >. Europe PMC is a service of the Europe PMC Funders' Group, in partnership with the European Bioinformatics Institute; and in cooperation with the National Center for Biotechnology Information at the U.S.

National Library of Medicine (NCBI/NLM).It includes content provided to the PMC International archive by participating publishers. In radiobiology, the relative biological effectiveness (often abbreviated as RBE) is the ratio of biological effectiveness of one type of ionizing radiation relative to another, given the same amount of absorbed RBE is an empirical value that varies depending on the type of ionizing radiation, the energies involved, the biological effects being considered such as cell death, and the.

In particular, gamma radiation is ionizing radiation, meaning that it is sufficiently energetic to break bonds in genetic material, structural components of cells and other biological molecules. For this reason, exposure to gamma radiation can cause a number of health effects, some of which accumulate over time, and others of which are acute 2.

Biological Effects of External X and Gamma Radiation. Part I. Coronavirus: Find the latest articles and preprints Feedback Complete survey. Sign in or create an account. https Biological Effects of External X and Gamma Radiation.

Part I. Mole RH. Journal of Clinical Pathology, For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts. Username *. Password *. Click on the article title to read more.

In the WorldCat listing for Zirkle's "Biological Effects of External X and Gamma Radiation," there is a note that says that part one (IVB) was issued in the NNES, but that part two (IVC) has the imprint: "Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Technical Information Service Extension.".

Radiation protection, also known as radiological protection, is defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as "The protection of people from harmful effects of exposure to ionizing radiation, and the means for achieving this". Exposure can be from a source of radiation external to the human body or due to internal irradiation caused by the ingestion of radioactive contamination.

Radiation is defined as the emission of energy in the form of electromagnetic waves. These can be in the form of gamma radiation, radio waves, heat waves or particle radiation which includes alpha and beta radiation.

The other form of radiation is gravitational radiation. There side effects of radiation. How radiation affects cells Radiation. Ionizing radiation is energy transmitted via X rays, gamma rays, beta particles (high-speed electrons), alpha particles (the nucleus of the helium atom), neutrons, protons, and other heavy ions such as the nuclei of argon, nitrogen, carbon, and other elements.

delayed effects. Delayed biological effects can include cataracts, temporary or permanent sterility, cancer, and harmful genetic effects. For humans and other mammals, acute exposure to the whole body, if large enough, can cause rapid development of radiation sickness, evidenced by gastrointestinal disorders, bacterial.

Hussey, R. G., and W. Thompson: The effect of radioactive radiation and x-rays on enzymes. III. The effect of radiation from radium emanation on solutions of invertase. gen. Physiol. 9, – (–). PubMed Google Scholar. adshelp[at] The ADS is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX16AC86A.

Quality Factor. The quality factor of a radiation type is defined as the ratio of the biological damage produced by the absorption of 1 Gy of that radiation to the biological damage produced by 1 Gy of X-rays or gamma rays.

Radiation sickness is the cumulative effect of all this damage on a human body that's been bombarded with radiation. Ionizing radiation comes in three flavors: alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Alpha particles are the least dangerous in terms of external exposure.

Each particle contains a pair of neutrons and a pair of protons. The effects of ionizing radiation depend on the dose in rads, but also on the type of radiation (alpha, beta, gamma, or X-ray) and the type of tissue. For example, if the range of the radiation is small, as it is for \(\alpha\) rays, then the ionization and the damage created is more concentrated and harder for the organism to repair.Biological Effect of Ionizing Radiation changes caused in the life activity and structure of living organisms under the influence of shortwave electromagnetic radiation (X rays and gamma rays) or fluxes of charged particles (alpha particles, beta radiation, protons) and neutrons.

Investigations of the biological effect of ionizing radiation were begun.Part 1 of this book contains eight chapters by different authors on the effect of single doses of whole body roentgen irradiation; part 2 deals similarly in sev It appears from the last two chapters that neutron beams have roughly the same biological effects on animals as do gamma and roentgen rays, but an explicit statement to that effect.