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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

2 edition of Infrastructure and poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa found in the catalog.

Infrastructure and poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa

Antonio Estache

Infrastructure and poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa

by Antonio Estache

  • 287 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by World Bank in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Infrastructure (Economics) -- Africa, Sub-Saharan,
  • Poverty -- Africa, Sub-Saharan,
  • Africa, Sub-Saharan -- Economic policy

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementAntonio Estache and Quentin Wodon.
    SeriesDirections in development
    ContributionsWodon, Quentin., World Bank.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHC800.Z9 C347 2006
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24052430M
    ISBN 100821369024, 0821369032
    ISBN 109780821369029
    LC Control Number2006034381

    The reality is that Africa is showing both gains and losses. Roughly 40% of people in Africa live below US$ a day. People in sub-Saharan Africa are more than twice as likely to live in poverty as those in South Asia, the next poorest region globally.   To address Africa’s education crisis, African governments must implement policies that reduce poverty in rural areas, such as improving infrastructure, health and sanitation conditions, and.

    This chapter appraises sub-Saharan Africa's development experience in the post‐independence era. The evidence indicates that the experience has been varied and episodic. Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, the region has become one of the fastest growing in the world, but structural transformation remains elusive as growth is propelled principally by primary exports—fossil. By means of a legal and comparative analysis and a seven-step framework, the book explores the current regional mechanisms employed in Africa to address the challenge of energy poverty and access and whether they are effective in tackling the challenge of energy access, including regional energy infrastructure and regional energy regulations.

    Table of Contents. List of illustrations. List of contributors. Foreword. Preface. Acknowledgments. Part I. Access to justice in Sub-Saharan Africa: justice policies on reaching the most vulnerable and extreme poor 1 Engendering access to justice for the poorest and most vulnerable in Sub-Saharan Lawson, Adam Dubin, Lea Mwambene and Bisrat Woldemichael 2 Access to justice for. Gender, Time Use, and Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa sheds light on a critical dimension of poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa: time poverty. Although the concept of time poverty has been used in the development literature, it is not always clear what is meant by time poverty, how it can be measured, what impact it has on other areas, and what actions are most effective in addressing it.


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Infrastructure and poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa by Antonio Estache Download PDF EPUB FB2

Infrastructure and Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa analyzes the extent to which, how, and how fast the infrastructure needs of the poor have been met in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Estache and Wodon explore the extent to which some key policies have hurt or helped progress in trying to speed the expansions of coverage so clearly needed in the : $ Infrastructure and Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa analyzes the extent to which, how, and how fast the infrastructure needs of the poor have been met in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Estache and Wodon explore the extent to which some key policies have hurt or helped progress in trying to speed the expansions of coverage so clearly needed in the by: Infrastructure and Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa analyzes the extent to which, how, and how fast the infrastructure needs of the poor have been met in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Estache and Wodon explore the extent to which some key policies have hurt or helped progress in trying to speed the expansions of coverage so clearly needed in the region.

Summary: Infrastructure and Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa analyzes the extent to which, how, and how fast the infrastructure needs of the poor have been met in Sub-Saharan Africa. Infrastructure and Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa, by A. Estache and Q.

Wodon. The Journal of Development Studies: Vol. 53, No. 3, pp. Downloadable. This paper reviews the book 'Infrastructure and Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa' by Antonio Estache and Quentin Wodon.

The authors summarize the political debate on infrastructure policy in Africa in a very compelling and knowledgeable way and make a convincing case for pro-poor subsidies. Yet, this review points out two reservations: The evidence on the welfare enhancing.

While the economic growth renaissance in sub-Saharan Africa is widely recognized, much less is known about progress in living conditions. This book comprehensively evaluates trends in living conditions in 16 major sub-Saharan African countries, corresponding to nearly 75% of the total population.

A striking diversity of experience emerges. Sub-Saharan Africa ranks consistently at the bottom of all developing regions in terms of infrastructure performance, and an increasing number of observers point to deficient infrastructure as a major obstacle for growth and poverty reduction across the region.

Poor infrastructure is a major obstacle to growth in most emerging markets. It limits opportunities, creates inconveniences, and sustains high costs for basic services. The problem is particularly acute in sub-Saharan Africa, which needs to maintain existing infrastructure, and make significant new investments to fuel growth and lift people out of poverty.

Infrastructure and Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa analyzes the extent to which, how, and how fast the infrastructure needs of the poor have been met in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). © Antonio Estache. Recovering and accelerating economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa is widely recognized.

However, less is known about improvements in welfare and poverty reduction. Despite high reported growth rates, grassroots poverty remains little changed, contrasting with a number of optimistic (and disputed) assessments published based on internationally available datasets. Concerns have been raised about.

Sub-Saharan Africa April POVERTY Period Poverty Economist: Carlos da Maia (million) 15 to 64 years old 59 41 34 66 Access to basic infrastructure 65 and older 56 44 35 65 No access to limited-standard drinking water Poverty & Equity Brief Benin Sub-Saharan Africa.

Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Overall Assessment The development challenge facing the sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) can be described by a variety of poverty and inequality measures through time or in comparison with other nations or regions of the world. On average, 45 per cent of sub-Saharan Africa.

Sub-Saharan Africa ranks at the bottom of all developing regions in virtually all dimensions of infrastructure performance. The region, which houses almost one-seventh of the world’s population, has a score of in the infrastructure category of the World Economic Forum’s (WEF’s) Global Competitiveness Report.

This book explores the current regional mechanisms employed in Sub-Saharan Africa to address the challenge of energy poverty and access and whether they are effective in tackling the challenge of energy access, including regional energy infrastructure and regional energy regulations.

The papers in this volume examine the links between gender, time use, and poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa. They contribute to a broader definition of poverty to include “time poverty,” and to a broader definition of work to include household work.

human capital and infrastructure, improve competitiveness, foster economic diversification, and promote private sector development. In addition, most action plans crafted in these The survey of poverty reduction strategies in Sub-Saharan Africa suggests that anti-poverty.

To Stockholm, for Sida’s Development Talks on the theme ‘Africa rising?Poverty and growth in sub-Saharan Africa’.Finn Tarp and Andy McKay spoke about their new UNU-WIDER book, co-edited with Channing Arndt, entitled Growth and Poverty Reduction in Sub-Saharan Africa—the book is on full open access and you can download it from here.

The event provided a perfect platform for a good. Unfortunately, in most countries of sub-Saharan Africa, agriculture has grown much more slowly than population, agricultural incomes have stagnated in real terms, or fallen.

The major problems continue to be poor economic and agricultural policy, and inadequate public investment in infrastructure, rural education, agricultural services such as.

Infrastructure and Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa eBook: Estache, A., Wodon, Q., LOMAS, KATHRYN: : Kindle Store. The ineffectiveness of the swift economic growth to reduce poverty can be also due to lack of good governance in the region.

Even if Sub-Saharan Africa has abundant of human and natural resources.The relationship between infrastructure, growth and poverty is empirically robust in the macro- economic and microeconomic literature as well as in the rapidly evolving randomised field evaluation studies.

This article appraises the role of infrastructure in economic growth and poverty alleviation in Africa.Poverty in Africa is the lack of provision to satisfy the basic human needs of certain people in n nations typically fall toward the bottom of any list measuring small size economic activity, such as income per capita or GDP per capita, despite a wealth of natural resources.

In22 of 24 nations identified as having "Low Human Development" on the United Nations' (UN) Human.