Last edited by Malaktilar
Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

8 edition of Kansas and the Lecompton constitution. found in the catalog.

Kansas and the Lecompton constitution.

by Israel Washburn

  • 281 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by Buell & Blanchard, printers in [Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Kansas
    • Subjects:
    • Kansas -- Politics and government -- 1854-1861 -- Speeches in Congress

    • Edition Notes

      Caption title.

      StatementSpeech of Hon. I. Washburn, jr., of Maine. Delivered in the House of representatives, January 7, 1858.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsF685 .W31
      The Physical Object
      Pagination8p.
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL240088M
      LC Control Numberca 07006075
      OCLC/WorldCa820149

      Happy th Anniversary to Lecompton’s Constitution Hall this year! The poem below, written by Opal Goodrick, was read before the Senate Ways and Means Committee on March 3rd, , and was instrumental in the Legislative decision to add Constitution Hall to the State Historic Properties list. Genre/Form: Academic theses: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Cook, William Adelbert. History of the Lecompton constitution. (OCoLC)

      Historical Summary A FREE State convention sitting at Topeka, in Kansas Territory, from Oct. 23 to Nov. 5, , drew up a State constitution prohibiting slavery, which was submitted to the people Dec. 15, and adopted by a vote of 1, to 46, only free State men voting. A bill to admit Kansas under this constitution passed the House July 3, , but failed in the Senate. The Lecompton Constitution was the second of four proposed constitutions for the state of Kansas (it was preceded by the Topeka Constitution and was followed by the Leavenworth and Wyandotte Constitutions, the Wyandotte becoming the Kansas state constitution). The document was written in response to the anti-slavery position of the Topeka Constitution of James H. Lane and other free-state.

      I shall speak to-day of Kansas and the Lecompton Constitution. On the 30th day of May, A. D. , the memorable act, entitled "An act to organize the Terjitories of Nebraska and Kansas," was passed by the Congress of the United States. Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas. On Decem an election was held under this call, the Free-State men not voting, with the result of 6, for the constitution with slavery and for the constitution with no slavery. In the meantime, Governor John Geary had resigned on March 4,


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Kansas and the Lecompton constitution by Israel Washburn Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Lecompton Constitution was the second constitution drafted for Kansas Territory and was written by proslavery supporters. The document permitted slavery (Article VII), excluded free blacks from living in Kansas, and allowed only male citizens of the United States to vote.

In disagreement, Congress sent the Lecompton Constitution back to the voters of Kansas, where this time it was roundly defeated at the polls. In the end, Kansas became a free state in The Lecompton Constitution was written so that Kansas C) would permit temporary residents like the abolitionists and border ruffians to vote D) would allow slavery but prohibit the slave trade E) could only apply for statehood by permitting slavery.

The Lecompton Constitution was a controversial and disputed legal document of the Kansas Territory that became the focus of a great national crisis as the United States split over the issue of slavery in the decade before the Civil it is not widely remembered today, just the mention of "Lecompton" stirred deep emotions among Americans in the late s.

One of the most controversial, confusing and famous of these events was the writing, voting on and submission to Congress of the Lecompton Constitution by Pro-slavery advocates in Lecompton, Kansas in and the subsequent response to that document by President James Buchanan in a message to Congress in February, Kansas and the Lecompton constitution Paperback – Decem by Israel Washburn (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" $ $ Author: Israel Washburn Lecompton is part of the Lawrence, Kansas Metropolitan Statistical Area. census. As of the census ofthere were people, households, and families residing in the city.

The population density was inhabitants per square mile (/km 2).There were housing units at an average density of per square mile (/km 2).The racial makeup of the city was % Area code: Lecompton is a city in Douglas County, Kansas, United States.

It is part of the Lawrence, Kansas Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was at the census. Lecompton played a major historical role in pre-Civil War America as the Territorial capital of Kansas from to This time period was known as Bleeding Kansas.

Kansas--the Lecompton Constitution;: Speech in the Senate of the United States, March 4, [Hammond, James Henry] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Kansas--the Lecompton Constitution;: Speech in the Senate of the United States, March 4, Author: James Henry Hammond.

Lecompton Constitution. The Lecompton Constitution was adopted by a Convention convened by the official pro-slavery government on November 7, The constitution would have allowed slavery in Kansas as drafted, but the slavery provision was put to a vote.

the Lecompton Constitution was identified with the proslavery element, and the New England Immigrant Aid Society was associated with the antislavery free-soilers.

Inthe breaking point over slavery in Kansas came with. Lecompton Constitution, (), instrument framed in Lecompton, Kan., by Southern pro- slavery advocates of Kansas statehood.

It contained clauses protecting slaveholding and a bill of rights excluding free blacks, and it added to the frictions leading up to the U.S. Civil War. Though it was rejected in a territorial election (January Congress rejected this constitution and the request for admission to the Union.

Read the Topeka Constitution. In some Kansas residents organized a second constitutional convention. This convention was authorized by the proslavery territorial legislature to meet at. Popular Sovereignty and the Lecompton Constitution Topic: The purpose of this lesson is to study the Lecompton Constitution as it dealt with the issue of popular sovereignty.

Although the Lecompton Constitution seems to be about the issue of slavery in the state of Kansas, the issue would have to be decided by the people of the state. The Lecompton Constitution () was one of four proposed constitutions for the state of was written by pro-slavery people.

It included parts to allow slavery in the state. It also had parts to not include free blacks from its bill of rights.

LECOMPTON CONSTITUTION. LECOMPTON CONSTITUTION. When the Kansas territory was ready to seek admission to the Union inthe key issue was whether it would be a free state or a slave state.

The pro-slavery forces won control of the constitutional convention, which met in the town of Lecompton in September of that year. Bleeding Kansas Program Series Announced Constitution Hall State Historic Site, Historic Lecompton, 2pm Sundays. Suggested donation $3 per adult.

A series of talks and dramatic interpretations on the violent territorial and civil was of Kansas and the nation, Lecompton Constitution: Students analyze the debate over Kansas. Civil War. Google Compatible. This resource on the Lecompton Constitution is also included in the much larger Sectionalism and Irreconcilable Period Bundle, located here: Sectionalism & Irreconcilable Period Bundle.

8 engaging and Common Core focused resources. Dred Scott, John Brown, Nat Turner, Kansas-Nebraska Act and More!4/5(6). Territorial Kansas Outline. Poll Book, Atchison, Lecompton Constitution Author: Adams, Franklin G. Date: January 4, On January 4,by act of the free-state territorial legislature, the voters of K.

were given a second chance to vote on the Lecompton Constitution. Book/Printed Material Kansas--Lecompton constitution. Speech of Hon. W.K. Sebastian, of Arkansas, on the admission of Kansas and Minnesota. Lecompton (pronounced / l ɪ ˈ k ɒ m p t ə n /) is a city in Douglas County, Kansas, Unitedthere were people there.

Lecompton had a big historical role in pre-Civil War America as the territorial capital of Kansas from to This time period was known as Bleeding KansasCounty: Douglas. We, the people of the Territory of Kansas, by our representatives in convention assembled, at Lecompton, in said Territory, on Monday, the fourth day of September, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-seven, and of the independence of the United States of America the eighty-second year, having the right of admission into the Union as one of the United States of America, consistent.

Constitution Hall, Lecompton About a year passed before much more was done to write a constitution for Kansas. The federal government was clearly stalling on the issue of the Topeka Constitution, and both abolitionist and proslavery sides had taken to guerrilla warfare as a means of settling their differences.

Meanwhile, James Buchanan was elected president.